hoffmann

julius stahl's "lichtquadrat" (2020) is the most recent from an ongoing series of multiples published by edition hoffmann. predecessors were gianni colombo, richard paul lohse, vladimir stenberg, yoko terauchi, herman de vries et al. sometimes the production of a multiple formed the starting point of long-term collaborations––or arose from them. for julius stahl it is the latter. his work was first presented at the gallery in 2017 and recently on view at art cologne and miart, milan in fall.

view of installation: julius stahl, "lichtquadrat" (2020), light, pure tones, resonance apparatus, electronics, wood, 30 x 30 cm, edition of 8, edition hoffmann

view of installation: julius stahl, "lichtquadrat" (2020), light, pure tones, resonance apparatus, electronics, wood, 30 × 30 cm, edition of 8, edition hoffmann

julius stahl succeeds in enabling the visitor, following her intuition, to experience tones in space as plastic forms rather than fleeting sounds

simone schimpf, 2019

between seeing and hearing

visible, not audible sound, imagined space, planes made of lines, animated light—the artist julius stahl has developed a very particular repertoire and a precise technique for creating a unique sensual experience in an exhibition space. visitors are invited to see when there is something to hear, and to hear when it seems there is only something to see. while wandering through the exhibition, each visitor must continually recalibrate her own ear-eye relationship. in the process, surprising things happen: with a single tone, suddenly flat objects acquire a different spatial presence, or a print made by light on paper seems to vibrate. […]

the artist succeeds in enabling the visitor, following her intuition, to experience tones in space as plastic forms rather than fleeting sounds […] and get the impression that even what she cannot see is part of the work. space, distance, and emptiness are important elements in julius stahl’s work. they create a space for sound. but also for perception—of sensory spaces between seeing and hearing.

simone schimpf, 2019 (excerpt from "between seeing and hearing," in "julius stahl" (neuenhaus: kunstverein grafschaft bentheim, 2019).)

view of installation: "lichtquadrat" (2020), light, pure tones, resonance apparatus, electronics, wood, 30 x 30 cm

view of installation: "lichtquadrat" (2020), light, pure tones, resonance apparatus, electronics, wood, 30 × 30 cm

even if we are talking about a light object, it actually consists of two very intangible spaces. a combination of light space and sound space.

a ray of light is brought in the shape of a square. we see it here on a wall, with sharp edges, clearly defined. but that doesn't last long, because the contours become softer as you look at it for a long time.

view of installation: "lichtquadrat" (2020), light, pure tones, resonance apparatus, electronics, wood, 30 x 30 cm

view of installation: "lichtquadrat" (2020), light, pure tones, resonance apparatus, electronics, wood, 30 × 30 cm

the square seems to expand into space and a spatial body is created. how can that be? apparently there are also sounds involved, but nothing can be heard?

to achieve this, the artist developed his own instrument. a light / resonance apparatus. from this device, the ray of light falls on a wall and shows the actual light object. the ray of light is slowly brought to vibrating by sounds. a surface becomes a body. the sound remains inside the device.

view of installation: "lichtquadrat" (2020), light, pure tones, resonance apparatus, electronics, wood, 30 x 30 cm

view of installation: "lichtquadrat" (2020), light, pure tones, resonance apparatus, electronics, wood, 30 × 30 cm

we see a space that changes over time. light and sound spaces are connected to one another. this is made possible by reducing sound to its essential element, namely movement. movement that shapes concrete spaces.

here, light and sound do not convey anything in the sense of a projection. you yourself are the content and the medium. the extremely simple reduction to these two elements shows a work on the border of seeing and hearing.